Category Archives: Subconscious mind

Focus On What You Can Control

If you are pained by external things, it is not they that disturb you. Rather it is your own judgment of them. The beautiful thing is that you have complete power to wipe out that judgment now.

Our problems are created not by events, rather by how we interpret those events. Focus on what you can control.

The only two things that we can control are: our thoughts and our actions. Everything else is not under our control. We cannot control what people think. We cannot control what people think of us. We cannot control how people behave. We cannot control how well people perform their jobs. We cannot control how rude people are to us. We cannot control other people’s habits. We cannot control other people’s success. We cannot control how well other people listen to us. We cannot control how much our partner behaves as we wish them to behave. We cannot control what our partner fears or finds stressful.

Focus on what you can control for a more powerful, productive, and profitable life.

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Is Hypnosis Real? Here’s What Science Says

http://amp.timeinc.net/time/5380312/is-hypnosis-real-science

by Markham Heid @markhamh – August 29th, 2018

Look into my eyes. The phrase calls to mind images of a psychotherapist swinging a pocket watch. Or maybe you picture Catherine Keener in the film Get Out, tapping her teacup and sending an unwilling man into a state of hypnotic limbo.

“There are many myths about hypnosis, mostly coming from media presentations,” like fictional films and novels, says Irving Kirsch, a lecturer and director of the Program in Placebo Studies at Harvard Medical School. But setting aside pop culture clichés, Kirsch says hypnosis is a well-studied and legitimate form of adjunct treatment for conditions ranging from obesity and pain after surgery to anxiety and stress.

In terms of weight loss, some of Kirsch’s research has found that, compared to people undergoing cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT)—one of the most evidence-backed non-drug treatments for weight loss, depression and many other conditions—those who undergo cognitive behavior therapy coupled with hypnosis tend to lose significantly more weight. After four to six months, those undergoing CBT+hypnosis dropped more than 20 pounds, while those who just did CBT lost about half that amount. The hypnosis group also maintained that weight loss during an 18-month follow-up period, while the CBT-only group tended to regain some weight.

Apart from aiding weight loss, there is “substantial research evidence” that hypnosis can effectively reduce physical pain, says Len Milling, a clinical psychologist and professor of psychology at the University of Hartford.

One of Milling’s review studies found that hypnosis could help kids avoid post-surgical pain or pain related to other medical procedures. Another of his studies found that when it comes to labor and delivery-related pain, hypnosis can in some cases outperform standard medical care—including epidurals and drugs.

“It is very helpful for smoking cessation,” adds Dr. David Spiegel, a hypnosis expert and professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine. “Half the people I see once stop [smoking], half of them won’t touch a cigarette for two years.” A 2007 randomized trial of 286 smokers found that 20% of people who received hypnosis managed to quit, compared to 14% of those receiving standard behavioral counseling. The smoking cessation benefits were even more pronounced among smokers with a history of depression—hinting at an additional potential benefit of hypnosis.

Hypnosis can also be “very helpful” in treating stress, anxiety and PTSD, Spiegel says. Research has found hypnosis can even alter a person’s immune function in ways that offset stress and reduce susceptibility to viral infections.

But what exactly does hypnosis entail, and how does it provide these benefits? That’s where things get a little murky. “If you asked 10 hypnosis experts how hypnosis works, you would probably get 10 different explanations,” Milling says.

Almost everyone in the field agrees that the practice of hypnosis involves two stages, which are usually referred to as “induction” and “suggestion.”

“During the induction, the subject is typically told to relax, focus his or her attention, and that he or she is going into hypnosis,” Milling says. This stage could last anywhere from a few seconds to 10 minutes or longer, and the goal of induction is to quiet the mind and focus its attention on the therapist or counselor’s voice and guidance.

The “suggestion” phase involves talking the hypnotized person through hypothetical events and scenarios intended to help him or her address or counteract unhelpful behaviors and emotions. Milling says this is like asking a psychologist what she might say during a session of psychotherapy. Basically, it depends on the patient and his or her unique challenges, he says.

In some ways, hypnosis can be compared to guided meditation or mindfulness; the idea is to set aside normal judgments and sensory reactions, and to enter a deeper state of concentration and receptiveness. Both Milling and Spiegel compare the hypnotized state to losing oneself in a book or movie—those times when the outside world fades away and a person’s mind is completely absorbed in what she’s reading or watching. Research has also referred to hypnosis as the temporary “obliteration” of the ego.

“While most people fear losing control in hypnosis, it is in fact a means of enhancing mind-body control,” Spiegel says. Instead of allowing pain, anxiety or other unhelpful states to run the show, hypnosis helps people to exert more control over their thoughts and perceptions.

How does hypnosis do this? Spiegel’s research has shown it can act on multiple brain regions, including some linked to pain perception and regulation. Hypnosis has also been found to quiet parts of the brain involved in sensory processing and emotional response.

However, there’s a lot of controversy over how hypnosis works, Milling says. “Originally, Freud theorized that hypnosis weakens the barrier between the conscious and subconscious,” he says, adding that this theory has largely been abandoned. While some attribute the power of hypnosis to the placebo effect, “a more modern theory is that hypnosis causes people to enter an altered state of consciousness, which makes them very responsive to hypnotic suggestions,” he says. While talk about “altered states of consciousness” sounds a little spooky, there’s no loss of consciousness or amnesia.

Not everyone benefits equally from hypnosis. Milling says that about 20% of people show a “large” response to it, while the same percentage of people don’t respond much at all. The remaining 50% to 60% of people land somewhere in between. “Children tend to be more hypnotizable,” Spiegel says.

But even people who score low on measures of hypnotic suggestibility can still benefit from it, Kirsch adds. He also says it’s important to view hypnosis as a supplement to other forms of therapy—something to be tried only in conjunction with CBT, psychotherapy or other types of treatment.

Milling reiterates this point. He compares practitioners who are trained only in hypnosis to carpenters who only know how to use one tool. “To be an effective carpenter, it takes more than knowing how to use a saw,” he says. “Seek help from licensed psychologists, licensed psychiatrists and licensed clinical social workers who are trained in hypnosis as well as a range of other psychotherapeutic techniques.” (A benefit of seeing a licensed clinician, as opposed to someone who only practices hypnosis, is that the treatment is more likely to be covered by insurance.)

Finally, don’t expect hypnosis to work after a single session. While one shot can be effective, “in general, a single treatment session involving hypnosis is unlikely to be beneficial,” Milling says.
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In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, any copyrighted work in this message is distributed under fair use without profit or payment for non-profit research and educational purposes only.
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Photos and Video Link of Dr. Dave Hill Hypnotizing Nick Young of the Golden State Warriors

By popular demand here are some of the best photos as well as a link to the story of when I hypnotized Nick Young of the Golden State Warriors, which includes Nick’s admission on Twitter that he was hypnotized. Enjoy!

Click here for the news story and video.

Telephone Coaching Sessions Now Available

I have received numerous requests for telephone coaching sessions. These sessions are now available. You can book one by filling out this form

Benefits of Phone Coaching

*Life coaching via the phone will give you the support and feedback you need for creating meaningful changes in your life and achieve the results you want, while still being able to connect on a very personal level with Dr. Dave.

*Personal coaching over the phone enhances your level of focus as there are fewer distractions during the coaching conversation.

*Over the phone life coaching establishes an emotional comfort zone allowing you to connect more easily and communicate without feeling pressured to make eye contact or communicate non-verbally.

*Telephone coaching is most cost effective way to experience the benefits of coaching.

*Telephone coaching is extremely time effective. You will not waste any of your valuable time traveling back and forth to our coaching meetings. You won’t get stuck in traffic, no need to battle the weather or look for a parking spot. Over the phone coaching allows more flexibility in scheduling our coaching sessions.

*Phone coaching is not only practical from a time management standpoint, it also enables deeper and more focused communications between the client and coach.

*You can enjoy coaching in the surroundings of your choice. You can choose a quiet, private and relaxed place to be during our private coaching sessions. You will be able to connect with me from the comfort and privacy of your own home or office, wherever you feel most comfortable.

The fee per session is $125.00 for one hour.

You can book one by filling out this form

I look forward to working with you.

Celebrate Life With Maximum Power,

Dr. Dave Hill, DCH

“All our dreams can come true, if we have the courage to pursue them.”
-Walt Disney

How to Hack Your Sleep Cycles Through Hypnosis

https://hackernoon.com/how-to-hack-your-sleep-cycles-through-hypnosis-b41d522910fb

9 Shocking Facts You Never Knew About Hypnosis

https://www.bustle.com/p/9-shocking-facts-you-never-knew-about-hypnosis-9097676

By Carolyn Steber – May 17, 2018

We’ve all seen hypnotists portrayed in movies, as they swing gold pocket watches and whisper, “You’re getting sleepy. Very sleepy.” But did you know hypnosis is used in therapy? When it’s utilized by trained hypnotherapists, patients can use hypnosis to recover from trauma, move past addictions, and just generally improve their lives.

Despite the fact it can seem a bit scary, or like some form of magic, the way hypnosis works is actually quite scientific. “People are induced into a relaxation state, or alpha brain wave activity,” Edie Raether, MS, CSP, a hypnotherapist and behavioral psychology expert, tells Bustle. “It is a meditative state where the client is more open and receptive due to being relaxed.”

Once in the relaxed state, the hypnotherapist can begin to work with their patient on whatever it is they’d like to improve. “There are two types of hypnosis: suggestive and exploratory, which is very effective for PTSD (post traumatic stress disorder),” Raether says. “Unconscious and buried experiences rise to the surface and are expelled, allowing people to experience immediate healing.”

It works because the underlying issues are identified, and then addressed. As Raether says, “In the right hands, with a reputable, experienced therapist, it truly is the most economical and effective way to change any behavior, including academic and sports performance.” Here are a few more interesting things that can happen during a hypnotherapy session, according to experts.

1. Your Consciousness Will Be Altered

Hypnosis can make it seem like someone is “out of it” or asleep, when in reality their consciousness is simply altered the same way it might be if they were zoning out or daydreaming.

“Hypnosis is a dissociative process; an altered state of consciousness,” hypnotherapist Darlene Corbett tells Bustle. “What happens in the brain occurs as it does during a daydream.”

Once a person enters this relaxed, dreamy state, the hypnotherapist can begin to address their underlying concerns. “Hypnosis is focused attention,” Corbett says. “Because of its ability to focus, one can tap into so many areas of empowerment they do not realize they have.”

2. You Technically Hypnotize Yourself

Even though it may seem like the hypnotherapist is doing all the work or “making” someone become hypnotized, it’s actually the individual who is allowing themselves to relax.

In reality, “all hypnosis is ‘self hypnosis,'” Anthony Gitch, RHT, of Excel Hypnosis, tells Bustle. “It is not something that is done to you. It is a balanced dance with the therapist following where the subconscious mind leads, and then leading the subconscious mind towards profound internal insights.” Pretty cool, right?

3. You Might Feel Really Heavy Or Really Light

There is no one “right” way to feel during hypnosis. Either “hypnosis doesn’t feel like anything, or you may feel really heavy, or you may feel really light,” says Gitch. “It really doesn’t matter, because it is your experience and you will experience exactly what you need to experience.”

4. You’re Not Being “Mind Controlled”

One thing that might come as a relief to people who want to try hypnosis is that it may be a strange experience, but it’s definitely not mind control. As Gitch says, “A hypnotist cannot make someone do something against their will.” You’re still you, and thus in complete control of your faculties.

5. You Might Experience Changes In Just One Session

Despite popular belief, you can’t get stuck in hypnosis, or remain slightly hypnotized after leaving your session. “Although you may wish you could once you experience it,” Gitch says, since many people find the experience relaxing and soothing.

You can, however, experience visible changes once you leave. As Raether says, “85 percent of the people I see for smoking quit after one session.” But that level of success only works for people who allow it to work.

“If people are just hanging in there and need to hold onto their defenses to cope and function, then it is not wise” to try hypnotherapy, Raether says. “If people are emotionally fragile, I would not do exploratory hypnosis and bring more up, which may be more than they can deal with.” Instead, Raether says she would help a client build up their confidence and resilience, before trying to hypnosis. That way, they’ll be better able to handle whatever it dredges up.

6. You Might Relive A Traumatic Experience

Depending on what you’re seeing a hypnotherapist for, you might want to brace yourself for an onslaught of unpleasant memories and emotions. As Gitch says, “Some hypnotherapists are trained to illicit abreactions, which are the expression and consequent release of a previously repressed emotion, achieved through reliving the experience that caused it.”

Let’s say, during hypnosis, you want to forgive someone who hurt you int the past. “During forgiveness work, clients are instructed ‘to be’ the offender,” Gitch says. “This can be unnerving when the clients face and change as they become the person who hurt them.” It can be upsetting at first, but it’s all part of the process.

7. You Might Feel Triggered

“Many of our bad habits, phobias, or negative preconceptions are triggered by our automatic, unconscious thoughts,” hypnotherapist Grace Smith tells Bustle. “A smoker experiences automatic cravings, which trigger the conscious mind to reach for a cigarette.”

All of that can come up in therapy. But it’s a good thing. As Smith says, “Through hypnosis, the smoker can reframe these unconscious urges. First, [they] would examine why these automatic thoughts were there to begin with. And then, the smoker could begin to delete, update, or replace them with more positive associations. In other words, the positive thoughts get pushed to the front of the unconscious and they drown out the old way of the thinking. That’s why hypnosis works. It helps you get to the root cause of your habit or fixation.”

8. You Can Reprogram Yourself

As clinical hypnotherapist Traci Blank, FIBH, CMS-CHt, CPC says, there are three parts of the mind: the conscious, subconscious, and superconscious. And in between the subconscious and the superconscious is the “critical factor.”

“During hypnosis, we open the critical factor to access the subconscious,” Blank says. “So hypnotherapy is really just the process through which we access the subconscious mind to uncover the beliefs that exist there and alter the programming to better match your goals. I always tell my clients it’s knowing how the mind works then using that knowledge to make the mind work for you.”

9.You Have To Want It To Work

Again, no one can be hypnotized against their will. These suggestions and moments of reprogramming only work if someone wants it to. “Everyone has the ability to go into hypnosis but three things have to be in place to make it happen: desire, you have to want to go into hypnosis; belief, you have to believe you can go into hypnosis; and safety, you have to feel safe in the environment you are in and with the person leading you,” Blank says. “When all these things are in place hypnosis can happen.”

If hypnotherapy is something you want to try, it may be well worth your time. While no one should expect to be “cured” in one session, going in with an open mind certainly can help.

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In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, any copyrighted work in this message is distributed under fair use without profit or payment for non-profit research and educational purposes only.
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The Power Of Your Subconscious Mind

Your subconscious mind:

• Acts like a young child: Similar to a young child, your subconscious mind needs clear, detailed directions and lots of reminders. It takes instructions literally, so be sure to give it specific, positive guidance.

• Communicates through emotion and symbols: To get your attention quickly, your subconscious mind uses feelings, imagery and symbols. It’s your job to discern what they mean.

• Deals with positives only: Negative words like “don’t,” “no” or “not” are largely ignored by your subconscious mind. For this reason, it is better to say, “I am going to improve my health by avoiding smoking” as opposed to “I don’t want to smoke.” You can also use creative imaging to center your mind on positive thoughts.

Because your subconscious mind has a pervasive influence on your life, you can actively harness its power and direct its influence in positive, life-giving ways by:

• Expressing yourself artistically: Artistic endeavors such as coloring, drawing or painting make use of your subconscious by allowing your creativity to surface and making space for the expression of your true feelings. Because the goal is to tap into your subconscious mind, you don’t need to be a great artist, just open to the creative process.

• Rehearsing desired outcomes: A great way to program a new activity, skill or thought into your subconscious mind is to rehearse it and repeat it until it takes root. Similar to the countless songs and jingles lodged in your subconscious, you can rehearse new attitudes, ideas, outcomes and thoughts that you want to become reality. By frequently repeating out loud what you want, you aid your subconscious mind in catching on and helping you achieve your desired outcomes.

• Reviewing before bed: A great way to learn new material, such as exam material, goals, presentations or speeches, is to review it right before you go to sleep. Doing so helps transfer the content to your subconscious, putting it at the forefront of your mind as you drift off to sleep, and potentially influencing the content of your dreams.

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